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Standard II: Curriculum

Appendix 2.3: Logic Model for Evaluation of SLIS Master’s Degree Programs

Inputs Outputs
Program Investments Activities Participation
  • personnel (faculty, adjunct faculty, staff)
  • resources (time, money [including funding assistantships], technology, physical facilities)
  • partnerships with professionals and educators (including dual degrees, specializations and certificates)]
  • placement service and career counseling
  • personnel (faculty, adjunct faculty, staff)
  • resources (time, money [including funding assistantships], technology, physical facilities)
  • partnerships with professionals and educators (including dual degrees, specializations and certificates)]
  • placement service and career counseling
  • educational opportunities (including courses, workshops, independent studies, internships, research opportunities)
  • professional opportunities (including assistantships, consulting [i.e., for course projects], student library positions, student professional organizations, volunteer opportunities)
  • responses to advances in the field (e.g., updating educational opportunities by revising current courses and developing new courses)
  • degree completion
  • coursework
  • number of students doing internships
  • number of students with assistantships and other (semi-)professional positions
  • number active in student professional organizations
  • number of students involved in volunteer service
Outcomes
Short Term - MLS Short Term - MIS Long Term
  • ability to assist and educate users of libraries and information centers
  • ability to develop and manage library collections
  • ability to organize and represent information resources
  • ability to apply management and leadership skills
  • ability to conduct and analyze research
  • demonstrate basic technical expertise
  • analyze, evaluate, design, and manage information technologies to support effective organizational activities, work practices, and human usability
  • employ a sound conceptual foundation and understanding of research to enable development of strong, leadership-oriented careers as information professionals
  • develop appropriate information management strategies and policies for organizations
  • understand the theoretical and practical bases of information organization, storage, delivery, and retrieval systems
  • understand the economic, social, political, and strategic value, and the ethical use of information.
  • graduates will approach professional issues with understanding
  • graduates will have successful professional careers
  • graduates will take leadership roles
  • graduates will engage in lifelong learning