We are living in a data deluge. And library science is helping us make sense of it all.


Making discoveries possible

Today’s librarians are makers, bloggers, early adopters, technologists, and navigators — constantly working to make discovery possible.

For more than 50 years, Indiana University has been preparing librarians with the knowledge and expertise to manage this data deluge in all its evolving forms.

See the faces of librarianship   Tell us your story

A library's function is to give the public in the quickest and cheapest way: information, inspiration, and recreation. If a better way than the book can be found, we should use it.

Melvil Dewey
U.S. librarian and educator
  • The Changing
    face of Librarianship

  • Alex Kravis

    They say information is power. But information is only useful when it can be found, accessed, and understood. That’s why it’s a great time to study information science. Companies have more information than they can handle, and virtually all of them need experts to better organize that information so customers can find what they need.

    Alex Kravis, MIS 2011
  • If you watch Amazon Video, chances are you've seen Alex's work. She leads engineering, product, and operations teams that work on title metadata, classification, and a feature called “X-Ray for Movies and TV,” which identifies actor, music, and trivia information directly onscreen.

    Alex Kravis, MIS 2011
    Senior manager, program management (Amazon Video)
    Amazon
    Seattle, Washington
    Alex Kravis
  • This world contains a multitude of information. Librarians are uniquely positioned to find pathways through the beautiful mess that entails. At heart, we have a deep respect for knowledge and a fundamental capacity for sharing. You see that right away with our students. Showing them how to build understanding in a collaborative way is how I pass on the philosophy of my work.

    Nicholae Cline, MLS 2011
  • Nicholae has a reputation for being excited about librarianship— always looking for new challenges, whether it’s managing a library blog, mining the HathiTrust, or mentoring student interns and graduate assistants.

    Nicholae Cline, MLS 2011
    Scholarly services librarian, librarian for media studies and gender studies
    IU Libraries
    Bloomington, Indiana
  • As librarians, what we do is dynamic and constantly changing. It’s never dull and rarely repetitive. At DePauw, I work with great people. Our librarians and library staff are dedicated professionals who care deeply about our mission and the people we serve. I couldn’t ask for a better job than this.

    Rick Provine, MLS 1991
  • Whether showing faculty how the libraries can augment their work, or celebrating Banned Books Week with a “Locked up with Vonnegut” event, for Rick, the best thing about his job is the variety.

    Rick Provine, MLS 1991
    Dean of Libraries
    DePauw University
    Greencastle, Indiana
  • I like that libraries are a space ripe for constant reinvention while still retaining strong values rooted in information access and preservation. We exist to support the research and teaching mission of the university, which leaves so much space to innovate. The sense of adventure we can apply to our services excites me.

    Brianna Marshall, MLS/MIS 2014
  • Brianna is a digital scholarship trailblazer, working with researchers every day to find the right tools to help them manage, share, and preserve data.

    Brianna Marshall, MLS/MIS 2014
    Digital curation coordinator, research data services lead
    University of Wisconsin-Madison Memorial Library
    Madison, Wisconsin
  • Information science is an exciting field. It’s not just about crunching numbers—it’s about really understanding those numbers and how we can act on them. And if I can help improve IU’s retention and graduation rates with my work, that is very gratifying.

    Pallavi Chauhan, MIS 2015
  • Pallavi deals with “insane amounts of data” every day, and that energizes her. At IU, she works to process and visualize institutional data in order to help leaders and administrators make decisions.

    Pallavi Chauhan, MIS 2015
    Data and research analyst
    Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Indiana University
    Bloomington, Indiana
  • I met Betty Jo at a conference where she received the Distinguished Service Award for librarianship. She encouraged me to attend IU, and I came to study art librarianship with her, along with rare book librarianship, another area in which IU excels. My IU degree prepared me well for my job at the Met. This is an exciting profession that allows me to embrace innovation while sustaining core services and diverse collections

    Tony White, MLS 2003
  • It was a chance meeting with IU’s fine arts librarian Betty Jo Irvine that put the MLS program on Tony’s radar. Now using his IU degree in one of the world’s best-known art history libraries, Tony hasn’t forgotten his IU roots.

    Tony White, MLS 2003
    Florence and Herbert Irving associate chief librarian
    Thomas J. Watson Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    New York City, New York
  • I cannot imagine a more exciting time to study library and information science. The field is in the midst of a huge sea change, in which established canons are being challenged and possibilities are limitless. The information ecosystem includes many more players now, multiplying opportunities for collaboration and innovation.

    Brian Schottlaender, MLS 1980
  • At UC San Diego, Brian oversees a collection of 4 million print volumes and more than 1 million digital resources. He’s helped the university invest substantially in cutting-edge digital products and services, including archival management systems and research data curation services.

    Brian Schottlaender, MLS 1980
    The Audrey Geisel University librarian
    University of California, San Diego
    La Jolla, California
  • The definition of librarianship is broadening every day. We now need librarians who have deep knowledge of academic disciplines and pedagogy coupled with a passion for emerging technology. It was in a SLIS course at IU that I first learned to set up a web server and code in HTML. These classes gave me the confidence to later pursue and accept librarian positions that focused on technology.

    Susan Gibbons, MLS 1995
  • From ancient papyrus to born-digital manuscripts, the Yale University Library collection is vast and varied, comprising nearly 13 million volumes across eight facilities. Under Susan’s leadership, the library preserves the past while embracing the future.

    Susan Gibbons, MLS 1995
    University librarian and deputy provost for Collections and Scholarly Communication
    Yale University
    New Haven, Connecticut
  • I like meeting our students and trying to envision how the MLS curriculum and department can better serve them and better serve future libraries and other information institutions. With a top-ranked MLS program, we’ve got a reputation for graduating the best and brightest in this exciting field.

    Ron Day
  • Advising students, revising curriculum, and planning classes: as MLS program director, Ron makes sure that graduates are prepared to serve the needs of many different people, cultures, and institutions.

    Ron Day
    Professor of library and information science, MLS program director
    IU School of Informatics and Computing
    Bloomington, Indiana
  • The library science field has done an excellent job understanding the unique traits and needs of adolescents and how libraries can respond. I’ve used that knowledge to build a teen space that capitalizes on the magic of connected learning and the power of positive relationships between adults and teens. I like knowing that I’m making a difference in the lives of young people!

    Kevin MacDowell, MLS 1995
  • In teen-speak, Kevin’s job is “goals.” As manager of the library’s new teen hangout space The Ground Floor, Kevin spends his workday with kids aged 12 to 19. He connects them to many resources, from video games, laptops, and tablets to art supplies, manga, and board games.

    Kevin MacDowell, MLS 1995
    Teen services and digital creativity strategist
    Monroe County Public Library
    Bloomington, Indiana
  • In my digital curation course, I expose students to this growing field and how it is approached by top professionals in real-world settings such as IU’s Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative. My students examine the different types of work being done there, and then discuss how the MDPI project applies the fundamental concepts of digital curation.

    Devan Donaldson
  • Devan trains modern librarians. Lucky for him and his students, IU offers a variety of library facilities, technology resources, and national projects in which to gain hands-on knowledge about this exciting field.

    Devan Donaldson
    Assistant professor, information science
    IU School of Informatics and Computing
    Bloomington, Indiana
  • Makerspaces have become very popular in libraries, and we’re currently developing a mobile makerspace at IU’s Wells Library. It includes things like electronics kits, LEGOs®, a vinyl cutter, and a synthesizer. We’re encouraging students to create things, instead of being passive consumers.

    Leanne Mobley, MLS 2014
  • Leanne Mobley enjoys all aspects of her work at IU, but she loves anything related to makerspaces, where people come together to explore, tinker, and create using different tools and new technologies.

    Leanne Mobley, MLS 2014
    Scholarly Technologies Librarian
    IU Libraries
    Bloomington, Indiana

We want to hear from you!

Where has your library degree taken you? What innovations are you leading? How are you using technology in the workplace? What information are you making discoverable for researchers around the world?

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